Dating system used bc

Miraculously, fragments of actual textiles were recovered and preserved.

The presence of Mediterranean shells and of metal ores and pigments not locally available suggests extensive trade.

Since then excavations have completely changed the picture, although none has yet revealed a settlement earlier than about 8000 by a people living in mud-brick houses with plastered walls and floors, painted and burnished like those in contemporary Jericho.

Afterward abandoned for nearly a thousand years, Hacılar was reoccupied in the late phase of the Neolithic by villagers of a far more sophisticated culture having advanced agriculture and pottery.

In most prehistoric periods the regions to the south and west of Anatolia were under the influence of, respectively, Syria and the Balkans.

Much visible evidence of the earliest cultures of Anatolia may have been lost owing to the large rise in sea levels that followed the end of the last Ice Age (about 10,000 years ago) and to deposition of deep alluvium in many coastal and inland valleys.

Indeed, the first discoveries of Neolithic farming communities were made in these regions.

Until the 1960s it was thought that, apart from the coastal plain of Cilicia, Anatolia had remained uninhabited until the beginning of the Chalcolithic Period.

Village architecture of this period is undistinguished but provides evidence for the necessity of communal defense, which was accomplished by means of a circuit wall or—as in Hacılar—a continuous wall formed by the outside rear walls of contiguous houses.

The location of the settlement on a river subject to regular flooding suggests that irrigation may have been practiced; the presence of bones of wild cattle, deer, and boar confirms the implication of the wall paintings that hunting was still widespread.

The existence of other, less precocious Neolithic cultures shows that the peoples of the Anatolian plateau generally played a significant part in the spread of early farming..

Some of these buildings appear to have been religious shrines, elaborately ornamented with heads or horns of animals, either real or imitated in plaster.

The walls were decorated with coloured murals, repeatedly repainted after replastering, and some designs closely resembled the cave paintings of the Paleolithic Period.

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